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 Table of Contents  
CLINICAL INNOVATION
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 53  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 79-80

Composite veneered orthodontic bands: Easy solution to multiple problems


1 Prof. and Head, Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics, Mithila Minority Dental College, Darbhanga, Bihar, India
2 Prof., Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics, Teerthanker Mahaveer Dental College, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, India
3 PG Student, Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics, Teerthanker Mahaveer Dental College, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, India

Date of Submission23-Aug-2017
Date of Acceptance25-Jul-2018
Date of Web Publication04-Feb-2019

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Poonam K Jayaprakash
Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics, Mithila Minority Dental College, Darbhanga, Bihar
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jios.jios_156_17

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  Abstract 


Orthodontic banding still finds its place in day today clinical practice of orthodontics. Well-prepared orthodontic bands provide adequate mechanical retention, which is further enhanced when cemented with glass-ionomer luting cements. Banded molars withstand the occlusal forces better than their bonded counterparts. Composite veneering of these orthodontic bands can mask the objectionable metallic appearance of the orthodontic bands for better esthetics and acceptance

Keywords: Banding, esthetics, fixed functional appliance, veeneers


How to cite this article:
Jayaprakash PK, Kumar M, Bohara P. Composite veneered orthodontic bands: Easy solution to multiple problems. J Indian Orthod Soc 2019;53:79-80

How to cite this URL:
Jayaprakash PK, Kumar M, Bohara P. Composite veneered orthodontic bands: Easy solution to multiple problems. J Indian Orthod Soc [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Apr 26];53:79-80. Available from: http://www.jios.in/text.asp?2019/53/1/79/251544




  Introduction Top


Despite the popularity of bonding of Orthodontic attachments, banding still finds its place in day today clinical practice of orthodontics. Banding offers superior reliability due to better resistance to breakage by virtue of larger surface area of coverage. Well-prepared orthodontic bands provide adequate mechanical retention, which is further enhanced when cemented with glass-ionomer luting cements. Banded molars withstand the occlusal forces better than their bonded counterparts.

Non-compliant patients who frequently debond the bonded attachments and patients with enamel defects such as flurosed teeth, amelogenesis imperfecta and hypocalcified areas on teeth need banding of multiple teeth for successful completion of their orthodontic treatment.[1] Patient undergoing fixed functional appliances, too often report with debonded mandibular canine brackets.[2],[3] The repeated debonding and rebonding in such patients, can lead to waste of chairside time, increased cost, and duration of the treatment. Banding of teeth in all these conditions can solve the problem but comes with the disagreeable metallic appearance of the stainless steel bands with welded attachments.

Composite veneering of these orthodontic bands can mask the objectionable metallic appearance of the orthodontic bands. Composite veneering of the stainless steel crowns for better esthetics has become very popular in pediatric dentistry.[4],[5] Various methods have been suggested to enhance the composite-stainless steel surface bond. Sandblasting, etching the stainless steel orthodontic bands followed by the use of bond enhancing adhesives can produce reasonably good bonding at the stainless steel – composite resin interface.[5]


  Steps for Composite Veneering of Orthodontic Bands Top


Fabricate the orthodontic bands on the teeth that need to be banded, followed by sandblasting of the labial surface of the bands. Weld the brackets/molar tubes appropriately and cement the bands with glass-ionomer luting cement. Etch the stainless steel band and the adjacent enamel with 37% phosphoric acid for 20 s. Wash away the etchant and air dry the prepared surface. Enamel adjacent to the band appears frosted. Apply Universal bonding adhesive (Scotchbond™, Universal adhesive, 3MESPE) on the labial surface of the prepared orthodontic band and the enamel at its margin and light cure it for 20 s. Universal bonding adhesives increase the adhesion of composite resins (any chemical, light or dual cure composite resin system) to flurosed, hypocalcified or deciduous enamel, acrylic, bleached or wet enamel, dentin, metal surfaces, composite restorations, and enamel. Choose the correct shade of restorative composite resin and adapt it like a veneer over the metallic band and the adjacent enamel at its margin. Light cure the composite veneer for 20 s. If perfection is needed, masking agents and opacifiers can also be applied. Take precautions, not to extend the composite over the adjacent teeth. Finishing and polishing of the composite surface should be done to achieve smooth shiny surface.

Composite veneering of orthodontic banding can be used successfully in situ ations such as, over mandibular canine in a patient needing fixed functional appliance [Figure 1] or, over any prosthetic porcelain crown (if needed), in patients with fluorosis, or coverage of buccal surface of molar bands due to esthetic concerns in a patient with ceramic bracket.
Figure 1: (a) Lower canines are acid etched after cementation of the bands, (b) Composite veneering done to mask the orthodontic bands, (c) Fixed function appliance in place

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  Conclusion Top


Composite veneering of the prepared surface of the orthodontic stainless steel bands can make them acceptable to patients. Composite veneering of banded teeth is an esthetic solution to mask the metallic appearance over these teeth.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Rosenblum SH. Restorative and orthodontic treatment of an adolescent patient with amelogenesis imperfecta. Pediatr Dent 1999;21:289-92.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Rizwan M, Mascarenhas R, Husain A. Rotation wedges for forsus treatment. J Clin Orthod 2010;44:748.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Rizwan M, Hemanth M, Patil GS. Preventing delays in forsus treatment after canine bracket failure. J Clin Orthod 2013;47:108.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Wiedenfeld KR, Draughn RA, Goltra SE. Chairside veneering of composite resin to anterior stainless steel crowns: Another look. ASDC J Dent Child 1995;62:270-3.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Wiedenfeld KR, Draughn RA, Welford JB. An esthetic technique for veneering anterior stainless steel crowns with composite resin. ASDC J Dent Child 1994;61:321-6.  Back to cited text no. 5
    


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