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INVITED SUBMISSION
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 52  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 142-150

Infinite applications of finite element method


1 Prof., Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics, Yenepoya University (Deemed to be University), Mangalore, Karnataka, India
2 Reader, Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics, Yenepoya University (Deemed to be University), Mangalore, Karnataka, India
3 Prof. and Head, Department of Aeronautical and Automobile Engineering, Manipal Institute of Technology, Manipal University (MAHE), Manipal, Karnataka, India
4 Resident, Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics, Yenepoya University (Deemed to be University), Mangalore, Karnataka, India
5 Asst. Prof., Department of Dental Hygiene, College of Dentistry and Applied Health Sciences, Qassim University, Al-Rass, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Rohan Mascarenhas
Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics, Yenepoya University (Deemed to be University), Mangalore, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jios.jios_242_18

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Different types of orthodontic tooth movement may produce different mechanical stresses in varying locations within the root. The quantification of stress in the periodontal ligament is an important concept as stress in this tissue is transmitted to alveolus with subsequent bone remodeling and tooth movement. Constructing complicated three-dimensional shapes of tissues with different biomechanical properties and characteristics make the finite element method (FEM), the most suitable means of analysis. Finite element analysis is a computer-based numerical technique for calculating the strength and behavior of materials. This method uses elements, nodes, and contour plots to provide a good visual impression. The basic concept of FEM is the subdivision of a body into many smaller elements. The FEM is an engineering resource used to calculate stress and deformations in complex structures, and it has been widely applied in biomedical research. FEM helps to visualize stress, strain, and displacement and to study the materials of complex geometric shapes made of different materials and complex loading. FEM gives results with a reasonable degree of accuracy and has proved to be a less time-consuming process in experimental research. Even though small differences may remain between reality and FEM, the numerical system can reveal otherwise inaccessible stress distribution. The FEM has reformed biomechanical research in Orthodontics, as it represents a noninvasive, accurate method that provides quantitative and detailed data regarding orthodontic biomechanics and physiological responses occurring in tissues, tooth. However, FEM has “inherent” errors where an object with smooth surfaces will not be completely included, as the FE model uses approximated domain which tends to leave out some areas at the boundaries.


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