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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 49  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 139-144

Analysis of pharyngeal airway space and tongue position in individuals with different body types and facial patterns: A cephalometric study


1 PG Student, Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Saraswati Dental College, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
2 Professor and Head of Department, Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Saraswati Dental College, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
3 Professor, Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Saraswati Dental College, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
4 Senior Lecturer Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Saraswati Dental College, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Rohit Kulshrestha
Room No. 3, PG Boys Hostel, Saraswati Dental College, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0301-5742.165555

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Aim: To evaluate if the different body types and facial patterns have any effect on the dimensions of the pharyngeal airway space and tongue position. Materials and Methods: Ninety subjects (age 13-30 years) with no history of previous orthodontic treatment, jaw surgeries, or functional jaw orthopedics were taken and divided into different groups based on their body built. They were further subdivided into different groups based on their Frankfort Mandibular Angle. Group I included 30 subjects (15 males, 15 females) who were ectomorphic (body mass index [BMI] < 20). Group II included 30 subjects (16 males, 14 females) who were mesomorphic (BMI between 20 and 25), and Group III included 30 subjects (14 males, 16 females) who were endomorphic (BMI > 25). Lateral cephalograms were traced manually to evaluate the pharyngeal airway passage and tongue position. Results: When the comparison between different facial growth patterns was done, differences in soft palate inclination (P < 0.004) and upper pharyngeal wall - pterygomaxillary (P < 0.012) was found to be statistically significant. A significant difference among different growth patterns was observed for the soft palate inclination between the hypo- and hyper-divergent groups (P < 0.003). No significant differences were seen when a comparison between different facial types (irrespective of growth) was done. No significant difference was seen in the position of the tongue in all the groups. Conclusion: Different body types and facial patterns had a significant effect on the dimension of the pharyngeal airway space but no significant effect on the position of the tongue.


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