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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 48  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 382-387

Angle's Molar Classification Revisited


1 Postgraduate Student, Department of Orthodontics, VS Dental College and Hospital, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Professor and Head, Department of Orthodontics, VS Dental College and Hospital, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
3 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, VS Dental College and Hospital, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
4 Senior Lecturer, Department of Prosthodontics, School of Dental Sciences, Sharda University, Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India
5 Reader, Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Vananchal Dental College and Hospital, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India
6 Senior Lecturer, Department of Periodontology, Daswani Dental College and Research Center, Kota, Rajasthan, India

Correspondence Address:
Devanshi Yadav
Postgraduate Student, Department of Orthodontics, B-280, Sector 26, Noida-201301, Uttar Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


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Introduction: The Angle method for the classification of malocclusion has been the gold standard in orthodontics for over 100 years, but many orthodontists find it difficult to apply this system for the cases which lie in between the Class I and II grey area. Materials and methods: Five hundred pretreatment study casts were included and assessed with the proposed classification. In the modified classification ideal cusp-fossa occlusion is designated as zero (0). Any deviation from the ideal, i.e. 0 is graded in millimetres. A plus sign (+) designates Class II direction and a minus sign (– ) designates Class III direction. The right side is evaluated first, followed by the left side. Results: Of the 500 pretreatment study casts assessed 52.4% were definitive Class I, 23.6% were Class II, 2.6% were Class III and the ambiguous cases were 21%. These could be easily classified with our method of classification. Conclusion: This improvised classification technique will help orthodontists in making classification of malocclusion accurate and simple.


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